Shot in the arm for Heather Chimoga Orphan Care

By Kudakwashe Pembere in Murehwa A Murehwa organisation that assists under-privileged children received a $150 000 grant from United States government through the United States Africa Development foundation. Heather Chimhoga Orphan Care (HOCC) is a Zimbabwean child welfare institution which  started with just six children scaling up to 784. Speaking at the grant signing ceremony in Murehwa yesterday, US Ambassador to Zimbabwe Ambassador Harry Thomas said the funding shows USA’s continued commitment to help Zimbabweans in developing projects that improve living conditions that improve living conditions in their communities. “I…

Share
Read More

UNAIDS Calls To Quicken Action To End AIDS

The President of Uganda, Yoweri Museveni, in collaboration with UNAIDS, brought together six heads of state or government to accelerate action and get countries on the Fast-Track to end AIDS. World leaders joined around 500 partners from government, the private sector and civil society on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly to reinvigorate political leadership around HIV. The Fast-Track approach is saving more and more lives. In 2016, 19.5 million people—more than half the 36.7 million people living with HIV—were accessing life-saving treatment. The number of people who…

Share
Read More

Free Sanitary Pads For Zim Women…As Government Contracts Local Manufacturer

By Daniel Phiri WOMEN’S Affairs, Gender and Community Development Ministry says it is has contracted two companies in the country to manufacture sanitary pads that will be distributed for free or sold at low cost. Sanitary pads are a very critical component for women and girls reproductive health requirements but owing to their exorbitant cost, most are having to look for alternatives some of which could have after effects in the long run. Rural women and girls are said to be the most affected to the extent that some of…

Share
Read More

Drug Resistant TB Treatment Efforts Under Threat says MSF

By Michael Gwarisa Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) says limited access to to new drug delamanid reduces promising treatment options available for those with drug-resistant tuberculosis. According to MSF, almost three quarters (74%) of patients receiving a combination of these drugs for six months achieved ‘culture conversion’, an early indicator that treatment might ultimately be successful. “The WHO endorses delamanid to replace the injectable agent for children and adolescents with DR-TB in cases of intolerance or resistance to some drugs, giving this group an option that is more effective and…

Share
Read More