Open letter To President Elect ED By The CWGH

The New Government must prioritise strengthening of Primary Health Care to achieve Universal Health Coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals Now that the elections are over, the people of Zimbabwe expect the fulfilment of the election manifesto, in which you promised massive improvement in health infrastructure; more health personnel; accessible and affordable medicines; free medical care for cancer patients; at least one hospital per district, improved health services in resettlement areas, reduction of hospital fees by 50% and pursuing the Health for All policy, among others. As Community Working Group…

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How to care for your Butterfly Cup

When you receive your Butterfly Cup it is essential that you sterilize it before using it. There are 4 methods for sterilizing the cup: 1 Put a pot of water on to boil. Once boiling you can place the Butterfly cup in the water and continue to let it boil for a few minutes. After 5 minutes remove the pot from the heat and remove the cup. 2If you are not able to place the cup in a pan on the stove, it will be fine to pour boiling water…

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How To Manage Your Body After Stroke

A stroke happens when blood flow to a part of your brain is cut off. Without the oxygen in blood, brain cells start dying within minutes. By Belinda Pfende DID YOU KNOW that 1. According to WHO October 2017, Stroke is the 5th cause of death in Zimbabwe 2. 1 in 6 people will have a stroke in their lifetime 3. Stroke is responsible for more deaths annually than those attributed to AIDS, TB and MALARIA COMBINED 4. A stroke can happen to anyone at any age but in our…

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The Power of Virginity

In Zimbabwe there are many myths around the subject of virginity and menstrual blood. By Hazel Stede The Myths: 1 Some people believe women should not walk among the cattle when they are menstruating as they may cause the cattle to lose their skin. 2 A woman must not put salt in the cooking or someone may get sick. 3 Women, when they are menstruating are unclean and not permitted to attend certain gatherings or church services. 4 If a man sleeps with a woman when she is menstruating, his…

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Lacking sight, one farmer finds his vision

Yamurayi Choruwa, 43, was born partially blind. By Tatenda Rodney Macheka A name given by his parents when they realized his condition,“Yamurayi,” loosely translated from the local dialect, means “a call for help,” and he admits that for many years he spent sleepless nights crying and worrying about himself. According to the Zimbabwe Council for the Blind, it is estimated that 125,000 people in Zimbabwe are blind and twice that number are visually impaired. These people often face social discrimination, as well as challenges in access to education and work.…

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MyTherapy App Helps HIV Patients Adhere To ARV Timetables

HIV prevalence remains high in Zimbabwe, with recent statistics indicating that there are approximately 1.3 million people living with HIV in the country. In 2016, there were 40 000 new HIV infections and 30 000 AIDS-related deaths. However, there is some hopeful news amidst these worrying statistics. By Tracey Ruff Guest Writer Firstly, around 75% of adults living in Zimbabwe are on antiretroviral treatment – a number that is relatively high when compared to other countries in Africa – and secondly, international donor sources are channelling money into helping the…

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How To Attain a Four Star Diet Out of Little…A Look Into Staples

We normally don’t struggle much to attain this star Our staple (sadza) is the most common food we can eat from this group. This sadza can be made from maize, millet or sorghum. By Tendai Gunda But in addition to these foods, rice as well as roots and tubers such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, tsenza, cassava, yams are all foods we can consume to attain this precious star. So remember that delicious dish with rice and potatoes and soup, or sadza and potatoes only gives you one star!! So maybe…

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How I Survived Breast Cancer…The Story Of Sally Westwood

 By Sally Westwood “You have a Lobular Carcinoma, and it’s a nasty one.” My stomach dropped to the floor in shock. That can’t be right. There’s no cancer in my family. “But the good news is”, my doctor continued “it’s a stage 1, at a very early stage.” Twelve years previously I had had breast reduction surgery and ever since my annual mammograms had shown up several ‘fatty necrosis’, which are common lumps after breast surgery or trauma of any kind. My mammogram in April had shown these up again…

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Child Prostitution in Hopley Farm – The Vulnerability of Young Girls and the Struggle for Survival

By Karen Mangwiro Antagonistic life experiences such as divorce or death of parents or caregivers, neglect and abuse by families and extended family members as well as peer pressure can leave the girl child vulnerable to various forms of self-destructive behaviour such as promiscuity among other negative behaviours. At times the girl child tries to solve the emotional pain she holds. General family problems such as broken homes, death of parents when the children are still young and the absence of a reliable guardian to care for them are the…

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Without aid, who will pay for African healthcare?

By Simon Allison In Kigali, at the World Health Organisation’s first ever Africa Health Forum, delegates have given themselves one not-so-simple task: to provide universal health care to all Africans. But even should the assembled diplomats, medical practitioners, policy wonks and conference junkies figure out how to deliver on this ambitious goal, an even bigger question hangs over proceedings: who is going to pay for it all? We know who is not going to pay for it. Western donors have funded many of Africa’s health initiatives over the years, including…

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