Mental Health in the wake of Covid19

DEPRESSED AFRICAN LADY (pic by Huffington post)

The increase in community transmissions of Covid19 in Zimbabwe is causing concern in the population’s mental health. Psychological and social problems continue to rise and consequences such as stress, anxiety, depression, frustration, uncertainty and domestic violence are an increasing progression. It is therefore of utmost importance for the people of Zimbabwe to take care of their mental health. Healthcare workers: • You are likely to feel afraid, overwhelmed and experience lots of stress as the outbreak continues, it is important to acknowledge these feelings and notice when you are not…

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Coping with Retrenchment; A Mental Health Perspective

RETRENCHMENTS in Zimbabwe are expected to hit record numbers as a result of economic disruption from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic that continues to disrupt the global economy, many employers worldwide are left with no choice but to reduce staff in order to cut costs and survive.  By Dr Kudakwashe C Muchena Zimbabwe is not immune to this as is already seen in the Hospitality and Entertainment industries. In response to this predicted wave of retrenchments, this article seeks to give a mental health…

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Friendship Bench Helps 100 000 People With Depression and Anxiety

DEMAND for psychotherapeutic services has gone up in Zimbabwe as over 100 000 people suffering from depression and anxiety have accessed the Friendship Bench Services. By Kudakwashe Pembere Psychotherapy is a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health provider. Friendship Bench is an evidence-based intervention developed in Zimbabwe to bridge the mental health treatment gap. In Zimbabwe, there are about 15 psychiatrists in government health facilities meaning one psychiatrist tends to about a million people. “To date I can say…

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Post Cyclone Idai Depression Stalks Chimanimani

News chronic ailments cases recorded Both health workers and affected communities need psychosocial support FARAI Jochoma is by no doubt the most famous fast food dealer in Ngangu, Chimanimani. His makeshift food spot is a hive of activity throughout the day as foodies and local youths gather at his place to buy food or play a game of pool. By Michael Gwarisa recently in Chimanimani His heavily built stature and ever laughing personality hides a story.  A story that is born out of pain, grief and loss of friends and…

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Depression: Silent Killer for Young Girls & Women Living With HIV

PUBERTY is one stage associated with anxiety, joy and stress for young girls transitioning from childhood to adulthood. The hormonal and reproductive changes which include the bulging bust, widening of hips, protruding hindquarters and menstrual flows all just come too fast within a short space of time. By Michael Gwarisa recently in Gweru However, for adolescents and young girls living with HIV, this phase could be traumatic and heart rending in the absence of proper counselling and psychosocial support. Phyliss Mavushe (24), a young person living with HIV and also…

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Of Depression And The Rise Of Suicides In Zimbabwean Universities

Depression is increasingly becoming a killer. According to stats, NCDs such as accidents, cancers and even depression have been identified as leading killers globally. By Kudakwashe Pembere Matters of the heart a8re complex and can take a huge toll on a student’s mental faculties. Worse yet if coupled with academic pressures and financial crunches, the impact can be catastrophic. In Zimbabwe , headlines every year are splashed all over of students ending their lives owing to these pressures. Depression and anxiety have become increasingly prevalent in today’s college students, with…

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Rampant post-natal depression among Zim women

By Kudakwashe Pembere About 30percent of Zimbabwean women undergoing the 6 week post-natal checkups suffer from post-natal depression, a mental health expert said on Friday. Postpartum depression (PPD), also called postnatal depression, is a type of mood disorder associated with childbirth which can affect both sexes. Symptoms may include extreme sadness, low energy, anxiety, changes in sleeping or eating patterns, crying episodes, and irritability. Speaking on an SFM show, Dr Dixon Chibanda said this condition is common among Zimbabwean mothers. “Post-natal depression is highly prevalent in Zimbabwe. Studies that we…

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